Writing so Hard I had to Sit Down


So I write in the morning before my day job. I drop the wee one off at day care, try not to cry, and head to my office. I leave the light off so it’s just me and the screen for about forty-five minutes. I started my newest novel, untitled, the other day. So far we’ve got a broken down former Army Ranger caught up in an ethnic cleansing where a cabal of demon possessed humans are trying to wipe out all the remaining fae-folk on Earth, or realm as we call it.

Anyway I was writing a scene this morning where my Ranger buddy wakes up to find himself face to face with a cybernetic ‘interrogator.’ It’s kind of a black, scorpion looking thing that’s half underworld beastie and half robot that is used to infiltrate the nervous system of a prisoner and make them docile for simpler information retrieval. This thing is strong, it’s ugly, and it is not the kind of thing you want to meet immediately upon being jolted awake from a drunken stupor. As you can imagine the scene is pretty dynamic with my guy battling this thing as it wraps itself around his arm and tries to get at his brain stem. No spoilers but the scene ends with him bashing the thing against a stone fireplace until he shatters its carapace and takes a bath in yellow goo. He’s exhausted, and gross, and to add to that he’s hungover but still has that feeling you get when you wake up right before you hit the ground in a dream. You know kind of fidgety and weak like you just got done going five rounds with Randy Couture. That was where I had to leave it since it was time to start the job that actually pays me. I shut my computer down and put it away and started my morning ritual. Like most people, my morning ritual starts with coffee. I go through the motions setting up the coffee pot, cleaning out the basket that I forgot to clean yesterday and start organizing myself when I notice my legs feel a little jiggly. My arms also have that kind of tense feel you get at the end of a good heavy bag workout.


Weird, where did that came from? The most strenuous thing I had done so far in the morning was wrestle with my fifteen month old to change his diaper and get his clothes on (the little guy is a fighter in the morning…red head, go figure). It’s a strange feeling but I remember what people say about visualization techniques and dream states. How the body reacts to the events in your brain even if you’re not moving. I was intrigued, I’m still intrigued, so I did a little research.


I found an article in Psychology Today titled, “Seeing is Believing: The Power of Visualization,” by AJ Adams. The article cited a study that compared muscle gain in two groups of weightlifters. One group worked out at the gym, the other conducted mental rehearsal, visualizing themselves lifting rather than physically doing it. Here is a quote from the article:


“A study looking at brain patterns in weightlifters found that the patterns activated when a weightlifter lifted hundreds of pounds were similarly activated when they only imagined lifting. In some cases, research has revealed that mental practices are almost effective as true physical practice, and that doing both is more effective than either alone. For instance, in his study on everyday people, Guang Yue, an exercise psychologist from Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Ohio, compared “people who went to the gym with people who carried out virtual workouts in their heads”. He found that a 30% muscle increase in the group who went to the gym. However, the group of participants who conducted mental exercises of the weight training increased muscle strength by almost half as much (13.5%). This average remained for 3 months following the mental training.” https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/flourish/200912/seeing-is-believing-the-power-visualization


The article also went on to explain that visualization is a common practice among elite athletes, Olympians, and the like.


Interesting. I found a few more references alluding to the effect mental training has on the physical body but that article explained it the best. So, Was I in the zone, so focused that the story in my head was translating to my physical body? That hasn’t happened before that I have noticed. It was an interesting thing that happened this morning. Thought I would share.


What do you think? Writing so hard I had to sit down? Or am I reading into things and I need to hit the gym more since making coffee appears to tire me out?

Don’t forget to check out my work on Amazon or at any bookstore. My newest novel, Where Angels Sing is on sale now.


Author Inspiration: Bryan E. Robinson, Ph.D

COVER Daily Writing Resilience[1666]I get a lot of questions from people who ask how I write. Not so much what methods I use or strategy but how do you get a one hundred thousand word story from your head to the page? My answer is always the same: I keep it simple. I see a movie in my head and I write what I see. I word vomit for the first draft hardly striking anything from the page then i print it out and slaughter the first draft with a blue pen (technically it should be a red pen I guess but I’ve had enough bosses bleed over my reports throughout the years that red ink gives me horrible flashbacks). A repeat that process to varying degrees before sending the manuscript to a couple of beta readers that I trust. Once their happy with it I send it away to the publisher to start amassing rejection letters.

Sometimes people are satisfied with that quick answer other times they are not. If that is you then I suggest some light reading on writing process. Part of that process is motivation and planning. In his new book, “Daily Writing Resilience,” Bryan Robinson lays out a path and a strategy for those of you who are on the fence about whether or not you could sit down and get a book done.

“Daily Writing Resilience” provides readers with daily guidance in the form of  quotes, inspiring advice, and writing techniques, helping readers to turn their writing roadblocks into helpful detours. Robinson also provides daily exercises like meditation, breath work, yoga, stress management, gratitude, de-cluttering, and mindful eating. Daily Writing Resilience can help a budding author navigate the daily pressures of meeting goals and sticking to it.

The hard part about writing books is simply sitting down and doing it. No one is there to push you, it is the most blue collar, self directed process one could take on. If you face the very common problem of blocking out time to sit down at the computer and type then the rest of the stuff like plot, character development, style, and voice are irrelevant. If this is you, like it is most of us, Robinson’s “Daily Writing Relience,” may be worth a shot. Here’s Bryan’s bio and where to find him online.

Bio:

Bryan Robinson_6691

Bryan E. Robinson, Ph.D. is a psychotherapist and author of two novels and 37 self-help and psychology books that have been translated into 13 languages. His latest is DAILY WRITING RESILIENCE: 365 MEDITATIONS & INSPIRATIONS FOR WRITERS and CHAINED TO THE DESK: A GUIDEBOOK FOR WORKAHOLICS, THEIR PARTNERS AND CHILDREN, AND THE CLINICIANS WHO TREAT THEM. His novel, LIMESTONE GUMPTION, is a multi-award winner, and his latest thriller, BLOODY BONES, was a finalist for Killer Nashville’s Claymore Award.

Links:

website: www.bryanrobinsonbooks.com

email: bryan@bryanrobinsonbooks.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RobinsonBryanE

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BRTherapist

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Bryan-Robinson/e/B00DPT3UJ6

Google: https://plus.google.com/+bryanrobinsonnovels/posts

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show59849.Bryan_E_Robinson